International Research Journal of Agricultural Sciences

International Research Journal of Agricultural Sciences Vol. 1(1) pp. 11-18, May 2013 Copyright © 2013 Advanced Research Journals

Full Length Research Paper

Effect of premix and seaweed additives on productive performance of lactating friesian cows

 
Bendary, M.M.1; M.I. Bassiouni2, M.F. Ali2, H.M. Gaafar1 and A.Sh. Shamas1

1 Animal Production Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Dokki, Giza, Egypt.

2 Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Kafrelsheikh University,Egypt.

*Corresponding Author E-mail: hamedgaafar@gmail.com

 Accepted 30 May, 2013

Abstract

Eighteen lactating Friesian cows with average body weight of 534.44±13.04 kg, ranging from 450 to 660 kg, average milk production of 12.16±0.10 kg/day, ranging from 9.52 to 14.80 kg/day and average parity of 2.22±0.33; ranging from 1 to 5 were used during the summer season from June to November 2011, for 150 days starting with one week after parturition. Animals were divided into three similar groups with six cows in each group based on body weight, milk production and parity. All animals were fed the basal ration consisted of 40% concentrate feed mixture + 40% corn silage + 20% rice straw (on a DM basis) without additive (control) or with 25 g premix/head/day (premix) or with 50 g seaweed/head/day (seaweed). The seaweed treatment showed significantly (P<0.05) the superior digestibility coefficients of DM, OM, CP, EE and NFE and subsequent nutritive values followed by premix treatment, while the control treatment revealed the lowest digestibility. While, CF digestibility was significantly higher (P<0.05) for seaweed treatment than that of other treatments. Seaweed treatment showed significantly (P<0.05) the highest average daily intake of TDN and DE followed by the premix treatment, while the lowest intake was in control treatment. The highest ruminal pH values was detected with premix treatment followed by seaweed treatment, while the lowest values were observed with control treatment. Seaweed treatment recorded the highest ruminal TVFA's concentration and the lowest NH3-N concentration followed by premix treatment, while the control had the opposite concentrations. Seaweed treatment revealed significantly (P<0.05) the highest total protein and globulin concentrations followed by premix treatment, while the control treatment had the lowest concentration. Feeding treatments not significantly (P>0.05) affected the concentrations of albumin, creatinine and bilirubin and the activities of AST and ALT in serum. Average daily actual milk yield and the percentages of fat, lactose, SNF, TS and ash were significantly higher (P<0.05) and somatic cell count (SCC) in milk was significantly lower (P<0.05) for premix and seaweed treatments compared to the control treatment. Meantime, seaweed treatment recorded significantly (P<0.05) the highest 4% FCM yield and protein percentage followed by premix treatment, while the control treatment had the lowest values. The amounts of DM and DCP required for producing 1 kg 4% fat corrected milk (FCM) were significantly lower (P<0.05) for premix and seaweed treatments than those of control treatment. While, the amount of TDN and DE required for producing 1 kg 4% FCM were nearly similar for the different treatments. Feed cost (LE/ day) were nearly similar for the different treatments. While, feed cost per one kg 4% FCM was significantly lower (P<0.05), but the total and net revenue were significantly higher (P<0.05) for premix and seaweed treatments compared to control treatment.

Keywords: premix, seaweed, feed intake, digestibility, rumen fermentation,milk yied and composition, feed conversion, economic efficiency.